Whale Migration Spectacle Witnessed in Kilifi [VIDEO]

0
12
A Wildebeest herd on the move in the Maasai Mara Game Reserve.
  • A phenomenal spectacle involving migrating humpback whales is currently taking place just off the coast of Watamu in Kilifi County.

    Speaking to the media from the shores of the Indian Ocean, Tourism CS Najib Balala explained that the gentle giants travel over 5,000km Kilometres from the Antarctica.

    Coming at the same time as the Wildebeest migration in the Maasai Mara, CS Balala was quick to point out that not many people knew that a twin migration on land and sea takes place in Kenya every year.

    He then urged hotel owners to consider lowering their rates to attract more visitors and boost income for the local communities.

    A Wildebeest herd on the move in the Maasai Mara Game Reserve.
    KWS

    Footage has since emerged showing the humpback whale ‘breaching’ – this is when they propel themselves above the water and then splash back down. Some scientists think that they may do this to splash off parasites, but they may just do it for fun as well.

    Voices of excited fishermen can be heard in the background during the jaw-dropping experience.

    The humpback whales seen in Kilifi average 40 tonnes in weight, with their newborns said to weigh as much as 1 tonne.

    This particular whale is a fan favourite as it is one of the most acrobatic species, with its ‘breach’ responsible for some of the most spectacular marine photos on the planet.

    The great migration is occasioned by their need to calve and mate in warmer climate.

    Humpback whales are also well known for their haunting songs, which are complex sequences of moans, howls and cries that often continue for hours, according to the  National Geographic

    A humpback whale, part of the rorqual family of whales, pictured close to the Watamu shore line in Kilifi County.
    A humpback whale, part of the rorqual family of whales, pictured close to the Watamu shore line in Kilifi County.
    KWS

    Only male whales sing which has led scientists to theorise  that trying to attract potential mates could be the motivation behind males showcasing their vocal prowess.

    They mostly dine on small fish, krill (tiny crustaceans) and plankton. To eat prey, they take large gulps of water. Below the mouth are 12 to 36 throat grooves that expand to hold the water. The baleens filter the water, and the two blowholes on the whale’s back expel the water. The fish and other goodies then remain in the whale for digestion.

    Over the years, the gentle giant has developed an ingenious feeding method dubbed bubble-netting.

    Bubbles are exhaled as the whale swims in a spiral below a patch of water dense with food. The curtain of bubbles confines the prey to a small area in the middle of which one or more whales surface.

    During CS Balala whale watching expedition, he was fortunate to spot a mother and its calf heading back to the deep blue sea.

    Speaking to the media, hotel owners along the Kilifi coastline revealed that the Covid-19 pandemic had forced many of them to re-think their entire business.

    However, they also affirmed that there has been a steady rise in the number of local tourists over the last month.

    Watch a the mighty humpback whale breaching off Watamu’s shore line below:

  • Source: KENYAGIST.COM

    Leave a Reply

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.