Banned Activities This Christmas Season

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Deputy President William Ruto addressing congregants at Presbyterian Church of East Africa (PCEA) St. John Kimuchia Parish, Chogoria, Tharaka Nithi County.
  • Kenyans will have to shelve a number of activities this Christmas season due to restrictions put in place to combat the spread of Covid-19.

    Earlier during the month, Industrialisation, Trade and Enterprise Development CS Betty Maina urged the government, media and the public to redouble efforts to promote safety precautions during the festivities.

    “Those looking for a colourful festive period should understand the difficult period the entire world is facing and shelve their plans for another time,” she stated.

    Below are some of the activities that will have to be shelved this year as Kenyans sit down to celebrate the festive season.

    1.) Church keshas

    On a normal Christmas, Christians marking the birth of Jesus would troupe to worship areas across the country on the night of 24th of December to celebrate. This, however, may not be the case as Kenya continues to grapple with the vagaries of Covid-19 pandemic.

    The 10pm to 4am curfew will be in force, no doubt, and the police will definitely be looking to enforce the rule to the latter. Christians may have to celebrate at home – as a family – or follow their favourite preachers sharing the message online from the comfort of their couch.

    Deputy President William Ruto addressing congregants at Presbyterian Church of East Africa (PCEA) St. John Kimuchia Parish, Chogoria, Tharaka Nithi County. November 1, 2020.
    DPPS

    2.) Trooping to the bar with friends

    If you imbibe, you must be scratching your head making plans of how to stock your home pub this festive season. The government has stiffened measures for bar operators and patrons which will no doubt make visiting certain entertainment joints this Christmas period a tall order.

    Already, bar patrons have been warned on using the dance floor or sitting by the counter on what is christened “sina tabu” pose.

    A Covid-19 liaison officer will be present at entertainment establishments. They have been tasked with restricting the number of revellers in a bar and ensuring that Covid-19 hygiene guidelines are followed.

    In addition, revellers will not stay at the clubs all night. They will need to be home by 10pm

    File image of a man holding a glass of alcohol
    File image of a man holding a glass of alcohol
    Twitter

    3.) Large social gatherings

    It will be difficult to hold large social gatherings with either family or friends this year as Kenyans will be required to observe the social distancing directive even during the festivities.

    Concerts and other activities that often happen around the country during Christmas will definitely not be there. Kenyans who love going out there to shake their legs and wiggle their waists in the spirit of Christmas will have to engage in a more restrained activity – like listening to music at the backyard – with a family member.

    A file image of a social gathering
    A file image of a social gathering
    File

    4.) Travelling upcountry in droves

    After a hard year’s work, it has always been a tradition that most Kenyans visit upcountry for gatherings and merrymaking with other family members.

    It may be challenging for the same to be witnessed this year following hiked prices by Public Service Vehicle (PSV) operators.

    kenyagist.com spoke to John Wafula who stated that fare from Nairobi to Kakamega had been hiked to Ksh 2,500 from the usual Ksh 1,500. He added that he had to cancel his plans after this development.

  • Source: KENYAGIST.COM

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